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i don't know if you know an answer necessarily but, what does it mean to be gender queer? like i know sometimes i feel more masculine than feminine and vice versa but i don't knjow if there is a way to categorize it... any input or thoughts would be much appreciated

Asked by
525600selfies

hi there!

to the best of my knowledge — though, caveat, I am cis, and the “best of my knowledge” is not lived experience and I’m more than happy to hear from anybody for whom it is — genderqueer is an umbrella term that covers nonbinary, agender, and genderfluid people, as well as people who are bigender, pangender, etc. basically, it’s a term for people who have identities outside of male or female/outside of the gender binary. 

hope that helps! many hugs (if you are comfy with hugs) as you explore your identity :)

I read an article that this YouTuber, Shane Dawson portrayed Wendy Williams for a comedic skit and of course dressed up like her and painted his skin brown. I get black face. I get how offensive it can be when someone who is tanned or browned (Prince of Persia) to give off a PoC impression when they're actually a White person. But he's a comedian. How else would he have made fun of her? Ask someone who is Black to portray her? I'm sorry if this sounds odd, but I don't know who to ask.

Asked by
Anonymous

I know that this is a novel idea, but maybe — just maybe — white men shouldn’t make fun of black women

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

(via katielikesthis)

When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women.

Sally Kempton

I feel this is very important.

(via yourenotsylviaplath)

It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them.

(via lepetitmortpourmoi)

"Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted."

(via misandry-mermaid)

(via ginnyfreakinweasley)

dumb but serious question: do fat activists want to be fat (potentially lifelong desire) or are they just making the best of their life situations (not to imply that it is a negative experience for these individuals to be fat)? i hope this is as offensive-free as it can be :x plz direct me to or educate me on language if necessary.

Asked by
Anonymous

not a dumb question, I think I get what you mean

I THINK (pls feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) that you’re asking if fat activists work to maintain their fatness, or if they’re trying to self-care in a world that is downright nasty to them about a bodily reality they shouldn’t need to change in order to be treated well

and I think that I can’t speak for all fat activists!

but for me, my bodily reality is that I am fat and always have been, and I don’t think that I should subsequently be treated as less than human. I don’t think any person should be treated as less than human, regardless of their bodily reality. 

in my experience and with my activism, it’s less about “wanting to be fat” and more about accepting yourself as you are, and loving the person you are, body included

honestly, if someone were to tell me tomorrow that they could wave a magic wand and I would be thin, that would be a really tough thing to turn down, just because I know that a lot of things about my life would be easier. but what I would RATHER is that all people, regardless of body size or race or gender identity or sexuality, were treated well and with compassion.

I hope this answers your question!

breelifts:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part I)

The St Louis County Council wasn’t as bad as Ferguson’s Council, but still very few answers and virtually no accountability from the folks who unleashed unholy hell on the residents of Ferguson, following Brown’s murder. #staywoke #farfromover

KEEP POSTING I NEED TO KNOW! DONT STOP POSTING ABOUT THIS. IT IS NOT OVER!

(via bahaarein)

oh my god okay I’m putting a moratorium on songs about fuckin’ “all about that bass” and skinny shaming

i’m just not gonna answer them anymore, they will be immediately deleted because I’m getting ten a day and they’re all the same shit

at least ask me about anaconda (which is a fantastic song) instead, jesus

You say you'll find body positivity on your blog, but all I see is you bitching about how skinny shaming isn't real. Stupid entitled fat people , along with other minorities think the whole world should praise them for being so accepting of themselves. Nope. You're not healthy. it's gross.

Asked by
Anonymous

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I’d rather be fat than a racist bigoted coward sending anon hate, tbqh.