big fat feminist

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dumb but serious question: do fat activists want to be fat (potentially lifelong desire) or are they just making the best of their life situations (not to imply that it is a negative experience for these individuals to be fat)? i hope this is as offensive-free as it can be :x plz direct me to or educate me on language if necessary.

Asked by
Anonymous

not a dumb question, I think I get what you mean

I THINK (pls feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) that you’re asking if fat activists work to maintain their fatness, or if they’re trying to self-care in a world that is downright nasty to them about a bodily reality they shouldn’t need to change in order to be treated well

and I think that I can’t speak for all fat activists!

but for me, my bodily reality is that I am fat and always have been, and I don’t think that I should subsequently be treated as less than human. I don’t think any person should be treated as less than human, regardless of their bodily reality. 

in my experience and with my activism, it’s less about “wanting to be fat” and more about accepting yourself as you are, and loving the person you are, body included

honestly, if someone were to tell me tomorrow that they could wave a magic wand and I would be thin, that would be a really tough thing to turn down, just because I know that a lot of things about my life would be easier. but what I would RATHER is that all people, regardless of body size or race or gender identity or sexuality, were treated well and with compassion.

I hope this answers your question!

You say you'll find body positivity on your blog, but all I see is you bitching about how skinny shaming isn't real. Stupid entitled fat people , along with other minorities think the whole world should praise them for being so accepting of themselves. Nope. You're not healthy. it's gross.

Asked by
Anonymous

image

I’d rather be fat than a racist bigoted coward sending anon hate, tbqh.

Isn't saying, "we can have more than one conversation about a piece of media; yes, this message is bad, but this one over here is good" the exact opposite of what you and others were (rightly) saying about the film Lucy? In that case, it was, "it's not ok that this film is racist and empowers white women at the expense of people of color." But with this song you're saying, "it's ok that this song is heterosexist and empowers some women at the expense of others, because it empowers some women."

Asked by
Anonymous

it doesn’t empower some women at the expense of others

image

but you know why bother looking at the context of a lyric in media criticism, it’s not like context matters or completely negates the argument or anything

there’s also a pretty strong argument that’s been made by others that the term “skinny bitch” isn’t a perjorative

The problem with All About That Bass is that, again, we have a song uses man's like of something to tell girls is okay. " Yeah, my mama she told me don't worry about your size She says, "Boys like a little more booty to hold tonight.""

Asked by
Anonymous

lmao okay this is like roughly the FIFTIETH message I’ve gotten about this

I KNOW

it is in fact possible to have multiple conversations about one piece of media; the conversation I chose to have was around thin privilege. I’m not interested in claiming the song isn’t problematic, and nowhere have I said that

and yes, it is shitty that heterosexism exists and that this song strongly floats on a sea of heterosexism and that sexual desirability based on what a dude wants is not ideal, howeverconsider that fat girls are told they’re fundamentally undesirable from a very young age, and then consider that a message about their desirability may not be the worst thing on the face of the earth

both of these conversations can exist at the same time! both of these points can be valid! because media criticism is nuanced, just like people and sexuality and our relationships with our bodies are nuanced!

please for the love of god stop sending me this painfully obvious point thank you

There isn't such a thing as heterophobia, not in this society anyway. That's why it's not powerful.. but I think a lot of people are not taking the time to thoroughly read your post.

Asked by
Anonymous

totally no such thing as heterophobia - or misandry, or reverse racism, etc

in that even if someone is acting in ways that look like what people believe heterophobia/misandry/reverse racism to be, they’re not real things because they don’t have any real power

lgtbq people may not like straight or cis people, they may not trust them, and they have a LOT of reasons not to tbh. ditto with women distrusting or disliking men and poc disliking or distrusting white people. I am sure that happens. I legit can’t imagine that it doesn’t, given how privilege oppresses those who aren’t privileged. but because this distrust and discomfort is born of oppression, it doesn’t have power the way that homophobia, racism, or misogyny do. it’s not structural. 

skinny shaming falls into those categories imo. and I get that makes people uncomfortable or upset to be faced with, especially since it’s primarily women-identified people who deal with extreme body image and self-esteem problems (hooray structural misogyny) and being told they have thin privilege can feel like being told they don’t have a right to their body image problems or that any bullying they’ve experienced doesn’t matter. but having privilege is not actually “you have a great life free of cares.” having privilege means, in the case of thin privilege, that you will get appropriate medical care. it means you won’t be the victim of a weight-based hate crime. you can be sure that safety equipment has been made to fit your body. you can be sure that, going into any store, you will be able to find clothing in your size. you can be sure that your body size won’t affect whether you get a job. your body type is not seen as a worst-case scenario. your health is not considered anyone’s business but yours.

honestly, the list goes on. having thin privilege doesn’t mean that you’re going to have a cozy happy-go-lucky life forever, just as having white privilege doesn’t mean you’re not going to face obstacles in your life. but it means that our society treats you better. that’s all. a grievance isn’t the same as oppression.

this is a really good privilege primer, and this is a really good piece on fat shaming and thin privilege.

I hope you choke. Skinny girls get hate, too.

Asked by
Anonymous

well, I hope that whatever hurts you enough in your life — whether that’s insecurity about your body, or someone bullying you, or something else entirely — that you decided to respond to a discussion of thin privilege with a deathwish gets the fuck out of your life, because no one deserves that

sometimes I get very frustrated by the world but I just wanted you to know that you are wonderful and I'm so glad people like you exist and idk just please continue to be freaking amazing

Asked by
assiezvous

these messages are my favorite kind of messages because they give me hope that there’s something to what I am doing beyond troll fodder

thank u tumblr user assiezvous xoxo

im not judging anybody or trying to offend them but when the nude photos got leaked isnt 1/5 their fault becuase why would somebody post a nude in the first place?

Asked by
Anonymous

nope no not at all nein non njet no wrong incorrect 

the existence of nude photos does not give anyone a right to distribute them to anyone else without consent

if you do this you are a predator and an asshole. people are not entitled to nude photos just because they exist. and you do realize that those photos were stolen by hacking icloud, correct? they weren’t ~*posted*~ anywhere

we don’t say “oh sorry your identity got stolen but aren’t you sort of asking for it by using online banking” so why the fuck would you say something like this

What're your thoughts on Christina Hoff Sommers? Someone recently asked me about her but I had never heard of her before. I looked her up and, from what I've seen so far, some of her philosophies/ideologies seem kind of questionable.

Asked by
Anonymous

I have nooooo idea who that is

Sommers uses the terms “equity feminism" and "gender feminism" to differentiate what she sees as acceptable and non-acceptable forms of feminism. She describes equity feminism as the struggle based upon "Enlightenment principles of individual justice”[14] for equal legal and civil rights and many of the original goals of the early feminists, as in the first wave of the women’s movement. She describes “gender feminism” as having “transcended the liberalism” of early feminists. Instead of focusing on rights for all, gender feminists view society through the “sex/gender prism” and focus on recruiting women to join the “struggle against patriarchy.”[15] A reviewer of Who Stole Feminism characterized gender feminism as the action of accenting the differences of genders in order to create what Sommers believes is privilege for women in academia, government, industry, or the advancement of personal agendas

I wish I still didn’t know